The True Spiritual Meaning Of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” By George Harrison

I look at you all see the love there that’s sleeping
While my guitar gently weeps
I look at the floor and I see it needs sweeping
Still my guitar gently weeps.
I don’t know why nobody told you
How to unfold your love
I don’t know how someone controlled you
They bought and sold you.
 
 
 

Download Video (Right Click And Save Link As)

 
I look at the world and I notice it’s turning
While my guitar gently weeps
With every mistake we must surely be learning
Still my guitar gently weeps.
I don’t know how you were diverted
You were perverted too
I don’t know how you were inverted
No one alerted you.
I look at you all see the love there that’s sleeping
While my guitar gently weeps
Look at you all
Still my guitar gently weeps.
 
George Harrison With Patti Boyd
 
PRABHUPADA TALKS ABOUT GEORGE HARRISON
 
Mr. George Harrison, the famous English musician,
who is my uninitiated devotee.
 

In London, however, we get some income by sales of “Hare Krishna Mantra” record and similarly in the U.S.A. we get some income by selling “Govinda” records and other similar records. From London the “Hare Krishna Mantra” record has worldwide sales. This is managed by Mr. George Harrison, the famous English musician, who is my uninitiated devotee. This boy has paid me recently $19,000 for publishing my Krishna book. The whole amount will be required for publishing the book in Japan. [S.P. Letter to: Hanuman Prasad Poddar, Los Angeles, 5 February, 1970]

 

I think George does not require to become my formal
disciple because he is already more than my disciple.

Is it not possible to have a small temple in George’s house so you can engage in temple worship? That is necessary. If there is a small temple there, then you and your wife and others can be nicely engaged. I think George does not require to become my formal disciple because he is already more than my disciple. He has sympathy for my movement and I have all blessings for him. He can easily spare that chapel for developing it into a nice Krishna Consciousness temple. We do not want any proprietorship right, but we want simply to utilize the nice place into a nice temple. [S.P. Letter to: Syamasundara, Los Angeles, 12 April, 1970]

 

Sriman George Harrison has certainly done an unique service
by contributing $19,000 for publishing my Krsna book.
When I was in London, he saw me four times and
he was very submissive and devout and he was not
at all proud of his very well-to-do material position.

Sriman George Harrison has certainly done an unique service by contributing $19,000 for publishing my Krsna book. When I was in London, he saw me four times and he was very submissive and devout and he was not at all proud of his very well-to-do material position. He has a reputation as a first class musician and he is considered to be rich or as they say one of the richest men in the world. Still he was not at all puffed up, but was humble, meek, polite, and devout. So all these qualities and his service to Krishna will certainly help him in his advancement of Krishna Consciousness. Thus I see that although he is not an initiated disciple, still he has been trying to help us in so many ways. [S.P. Letter to: Bhagavan, Los Angeles, 8 February, 1970]

 

He is a good soul and I am praying for him to Krishna,
so surely he will make advancement.

I am so glad to learn that Sriman George is making good advancement in Krishna consciousness. He is a good soul and I am praying for him to Krishna, so surely he will make advancement. His book, Krishna, is already ready for being sent to the press. [S.P. Letter to: Syamasundara, Los Angeles, 6 January, 1970]

 

I am marking that George has the serving spirit,
and that is making him advance gradually.

Please offer my blessings to Sriman George and all the other Prabhus there. I am marking that George has the serving spirit, and that is making him advance gradually. [S.P. Letter to: Syamasundara, Los Angeles, 4 May, 1970]

 

This good boy George Harrison, we must give him all glories.

Prabhupada: …given the facility of assembling in this nice house, this good boy George Harrison, we must give him all glories. We must be thankful to him that he has given us the facility, and Krsna will bless him more and more.
[Arrival Address, London, July 7, 1973]

 

GEORGE HARRISON TALKS ABOUT PRABHUPADA

 

I realized later on that he was much more incredible

than what you could see on the surface.

Mukunda: George, you and John Lennon met Srila Prabhupada together when he stayed at John’s home, in September of 1969.

George: Yes, but when I met him at first, I underestimated him. I didn’t realize it then, but I see now that because of him, the mantra has spread so far in the last sixteen years, more than it had in the last five centuries. Now that’s pretty amazing, because he was getting older and older, yet he was writing his books all the time. I realized later on that he was much more incredible than what you could see on the surface.

The thing that always stays is his saying, “I am the servant

of the servant of the servant.” I like that…. I liked Prabhupada’s

humbleness. I always liked his humility and his simplicity

The servant of the servant of the servant is really what it is,

you know. None of us are God–just His servants.

Mukunda: What about him stands out the most in your mind?

George: The thing that always stays is his saying, “I am the servant of the servant of the servant.” I like that. A lot of people say, “I’m it. I’m the divine incarnation. I’m here and let me hip you.” You know what I mean? But Prabhupada was never like that. I liked Prabhupada’s humbleness. I always liked his humility and his simplicity The servant of the servant of the servant is really what it is, you know. None of us are God–just His servants. He just made me feel so comfortable. I always felt very relaxed with him, and I felt more like a friend. I felt that he was a good friend. Even though he was at the time seventy-nine years old, working practically all through the night, day after day, with very little sleep, he still didn’t come through to me as though he was a very highly educated intellectual being, because he had a sort of childlike simplicity. Which is great, fantastic. Even though he was the greatest Sanskrit scholar and a saint, I appreciated the fact that he never made me feel uncomfortable. In fact, he always went out of his way to make me feel comfortable. I always thought of him as sort of a lovely friend, really, and now he’s still a lovely friend.

Mukunda: In one of his books, Prabhupada said that your sincere service was better than some people who had delved more deeply into Krishna consciousness but could not maintain that level of commitment. How did you feel about this?

George: Very wonderful, really. I mean it really gave me hope, because as they say, even one moment in the company of a divine person, Krishna’s pure devotee, can help a tremendous amount. And I think Prabhupada was really pleased at the idea that somebody from outside of the temple was helping to get the album made. Just the fact that he was pleased was encouraging to me. I knew he liked “The Hare Krishna Mantra” record, and he asked the devotees to play that song “Govinda.” They still play it, don’t they?

That was the thing about Prabhupada, you see.

He didn’t just talk about loving Krishna and getting

out of this place, but he was the perfect example….

He was a perfect example of everything he preached.

Mukunda: Every temple has a recording of it, and we play it each morning when the devotees assemble before the altar, before kirtana. It’s an ISKCON institution, you might say. George: And if I didn’t get feedback from Prabhupada on my songs about Krishna or the philosophy, I’d get it from the devotees. That’s all the encouragement I needed really. It just seemed that anything spiritual I did, either through songs, or helping with publishing the books, or whatever, really pleased him. The song I wrote, “Living in the Material World,” as I wrote in I, Me, Mine, was influenced by Srila Prabhupada. He’s the one who explained to me how we’re not these physical bodies. We just happen to be in them.

Like I said in the song, this place’s not really what’s happening. We don’t belong here, but in the spiritual sky: As l’m fated for the material world, Get frustrated in the material world, Senses never gratified, Only swelling like a tide, That could drown me in the material world. The whole point to being here, really, is to figure a way to get out. That was the thing about Prabhupada, you see. He didn’t just talk about loving Krishna and getting out of this place, but he was the perfect example. He talked about always chanting, and he was always chanting. I think that that in itself was perhaps the most encouraging thing for me. It was enough to make me try harder, to be just a little bit better. He was a perfect example of everything he preached.

I think Prabhupada’s accomplishments are very significant;

they’re huge. Even compared to someone like William Shakespeare,

the amount of literature Prabhupada produced is truly amazing.

It boggles the mind. He sometimes went for

days with only a few hours sleep.

Mukunda: How would you describe Srila Prabhupada’s achievements?

George: I think Prabhupada’s accomplishments are very significant; they’re huge. Even compared to someone like William Shakespeare, the amount of literature Prabhupada produced is truly amazing. It boggles the mind. He sometimes went for days with only a few hours sleep. I mean even a youthful, athletic young person couldn’t keep the pace he kept himself at seventy-nine years of age.

Srila Prabhupada has already had an amazing effect

on the world. There’s no way of measuring it.

One day I just realized, “God, this man is amazing!”

George: Srila Prabhupada has already had an amazing effect on the world. There’s no way of measuring it. One day I just realized, “God, this man is amazing!” He would sit up all night translating Sanskrit into English, putting in glossaries to make sure everyone understands it, and yet he never came off as someone above you. He always had that childlike simplicity, and what’s most amazing is the fact that he did all this translating in such a relatively short time–just a few years. And without having anything more than his own Krishna consciousness, he rounded up all these thousands of devotees, set the whole movement in motion, which became something so strong that it went on even after he left. And it’s still escalating even now at an incredible rate. It will go on and on from the knowledge he gave. [Edititors note: Srila Prabhupada: “Even if they stop (the movement) externally, internally it will go on.”] It can only grow and grow. The more people wake up spiritually, the more they’ll begin to realize the depth of what Prabhupada was saying–how much he gave.

His contribution has obviously been enormous

from the literary point of view, because he’s brought

the Supreme Person, Krishna, more into focus.

Mukunda: Did you know that complete sets of Prabhupada’s books are in all the major colleges and universities in the world, including Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Oxford, Cambridge, and the Sorbonne?

George: They should be! One of the greatest things I noticed about Prabhupada was the way he would be talking to you in English, and then all of a sudden he would say it to you in Sanskrit and then translate it back into English. It was clear that he really knew it well. His contribution has obviously been enormous from the literary point of view, because he’s brought the Supreme Person, Krishna, more into focus. A lot of scholars and writers know the Gita, but only on an intellectual level. Even when they write “Krishna said…,” they don’t do it with the bhakti or love required. That’s the secret, you know–Krishna is actually a person who is the Lord and who will also appear there in that book when there is that love, that bhakti. You can’t understand the first thing about God unless you love Him. These big so-called Vedic scholars–they don’t necessarily love Krishna, so they can’t understand Him and give Him to us. But Prabhupada was different.

Well, Prabhupada’s definitely affected the world in an absolute way.

What he was giving us was the highest literature, the highest

knowledge. I mean there just isn’t anything higher.

Mukunda: The Vedic literatures predicted that after the advent of Lord Caitanya five hundred years ago, there would be a Golden Age of ten thousand years, when the chanting of the holy names of God would completely nullify all the degradations of the modern age, and real spiritual peace would come to this planet.

George: Well, Prabhupada’s definitely affected the world in an absolute way. What he was giving us was the highest literature, the highest knowledge. I mean there just isn’t anything higher.

Mukunda: You write in your autobiography that “No matter how good you are, you still need grace to get out of the material world. You can be a yogi or a monk or a nun, but without God’s grace you still can’t make it.” And at the end of the song “Living in the Material World,” the Iyrics say, “Got to get out of this place by the Lord Sri Krishna’s grace, my salvation from the material world.” If we’re dependent on the grace of God, what does the expression “God helps those who help themselves” mean?

George: It’s flexible, I think. In one way, I’m never going to get out of here unless it’s by His grace but then again, His grace is relative to the amount of desire I can manifest in myself. The amount of grace I would expect from God should be equal to the amount of grace I can gather or earn. I get out what I put in. Like in the song I wrote about Prabhupada:

The Lord loves the one that loves the Lord
And the law says if you don’t give,
then you don’t get loving
Now the Lord helps those that help themselves
And the law says whatever you do
It comes right back on you

-“The Lord Loves the One that Loves the Lord”

from Living in the Material World Apple LP

Have you heard that song “That Which I Have Lost” from my new album, Somewhere in England? It’s right out of the Bhagavad-gita. In it I talk about fighting the forces of darkness, limitations, falsehood, and mortality.

 
 
Please follow and like us:

Author: Mukunda dasa

I desire to fully surrender my life and soul to Srila Prabhupada. Then I can become instrumental in assisting him with his mission of delivering all the conditioned souls to the shelter of Sri Sri Gaura-Nitai and Sri Sri Radha Krishna.

One Reply to “The True Spiritual Meaning Of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” By George Harrison”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *